Hello, have a lovely day.

Apr 02
neurosciencestuff:

Some innate preferences shape the sound of words from birth
Languages are learned, it’s true, but are there also innate bases in the structure of language that precede experience? Linguists have noticed that, despite the huge variability of human languages, here are some preferences in the sound of words that can be found across languages. So they wonder whether this reflects the existence of a universal, innate biological basis of language. A SISSA study provides evidence to support this hypothesis, demonstrating that certain preferences in the sound of words are already active in newborn infants.
Take the sound “bl”: how many words starting with that sound can you think of? Blouse, blue, bland… Now try with “lb”: how many can you find? None in English and Italian, and even in other languages such words either don’t exist or are extremely rare. Human languages offer several examples of this kind, and this indicates that in forming words we tend to prefer certain sound combinations to others, irrespective of which language we speak. The fact that this occurs across languages has prompted linguists to hypothesize the existence of biological bases of language (in born and universal) which precede language learning in humans. Finding evidence to support his hypothesis is, however, far from easy and the debate between the proponents of this view and those who believe that language is merely the result of learning is still open. But proof supporting the “universalist” hypothesis has now been provided by a new study conducted by a research team of the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste and just published in the journal PNAS.
David Gomez, a SISSA research scientist working under the supervision of Jacques Mehler and first author of the paper, and his coworkers decided to observe the brain activity of newborns. “In fact, if it is possible to demonstrate that these preferences are already present within days from birth, when the newborn baby is still unable to speak and presumably has very limited language knowledge, then we can infer that there is an inborn bias that prefers certain words to others”, comments Gomez.
“To monitor the newborns’ brain activity we used a non-invasive technique, i.e., functional near-infrared spectroscopy”, explains Marina Nespor, a SISSA neuroscientist who participated in the study. During the experiments the newborns would listen to words starting with normally “preferred” sounds (like “bl”) and others with  uncommon sounds (“lb”). “What we found was that the newborns’ brains reacted in a significantly different manner to the two types of sound” continues Nespor.
“The brain regions that are activated while the newborns are listening react differently in the two cases”, comments Gomez, “and reflect the preferences observed across languages, as well as the behavioural responses recorded in similar experiments carried out in adults”. “It’s difficult to imagine what languages would sound like if humans didn’t share a common knowledge base”, concludes Gomez. “We are lucky that this common base exists. This way, our children are born with an ability to distinguish words from “non-words” ever since birth, regardless of which language they will then go on to learn”.

neurosciencestuff:

Some innate preferences shape the sound of words from birth

Languages are learned, it’s true, but are there also innate bases in the structure of language that precede experience? Linguists have noticed that, despite the huge variability of human languages, here are some preferences in the sound of words that can be found across languages. So they wonder whether this reflects the existence of a universal, innate biological basis of language. A SISSA study provides evidence to support this hypothesis, demonstrating that certain preferences in the sound of words are already active in newborn infants.

Take the sound “bl”: how many words starting with that sound can you think of? Blouse, blue, bland… Now try with “lb”: how many can you find? None in English and Italian, and even in other languages such words either don’t exist or are extremely rare. Human languages offer several examples of this kind, and this indicates that in forming words we tend to prefer certain sound combinations to others, irrespective of which language we speak. The fact that this occurs across languages has prompted linguists to hypothesize the existence of biological bases of language (in born and universal) which precede language learning in humans. Finding evidence to support his hypothesis is, however, far from easy and the debate between the proponents of this view and those who believe that language is merely the result of learning is still open. But proof supporting the “universalist” hypothesis has now been provided by a new study conducted by a research team of the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste and just published in the journal PNAS.

David Gomez, a SISSA research scientist working under the supervision of Jacques Mehler and first author of the paper, and his coworkers decided to observe the brain activity of newborns. “In fact, if it is possible to demonstrate that these preferences are already present within days from birth, when the newborn baby is still unable to speak and presumably has very limited language knowledge, then we can infer that there is an inborn bias that prefers certain words to others”, comments Gomez.

“To monitor the newborns’ brain activity we used a non-invasive technique, i.e., functional near-infrared spectroscopy”, explains Marina Nespor, a SISSA neuroscientist who participated in the study. During the experiments the newborns would listen to words starting with normally “preferred” sounds (like “bl”) and others with  uncommon sounds (“lb”). “What we found was that the newborns’ brains reacted in a significantly different manner to the two types of sound” continues Nespor.

“The brain regions that are activated while the newborns are listening react differently in the two cases”, comments Gomez, “and reflect the preferences observed across languages, as well as the behavioural responses recorded in similar experiments carried out in adults”. “It’s difficult to imagine what languages would sound like if humans didn’t share a common knowledge base”, concludes Gomez. “We are lucky that this common base exists. This way, our children are born with an ability to distinguish words from “non-words” ever since birth, regardless of which language they will then go on to learn”.

Apr 02
ilovecharts:

Should You Go Out Tonight? Let Morrissey Help You Decide
via revolutiontrainee 

ilovecharts:

Should You Go Out Tonight? Let Morrissey Help You Decide

via  

Apr 02

bespectacledbisexual:

this is one of my favorite facts i’ve found on wikipedia

Apr 02
Apr 02
datzhott:

Plus-Sized Woman Rocks Bikini on Hollywood Boulevard to Promote Body Acceptance
Los Angeles is known for many things: great weather, a laidback lifestyle, and Hollywood’s biggest stars. But for many who live in La La Land, the pressure to conform to a certain beauty standard can leave them feeling downright depressed.

datzhott:

Plus-Sized Woman Rocks Bikini on Hollywood Boulevard to Promote Body Acceptance

Los Angeles is known for many things: great weather, a laidback lifestyle, and Hollywood’s biggest stars. But for many who live in La La Land, the pressure to conform to a certain beauty standard can leave them feeling downright depressed.

Apr 02

tofuandafakeid:

lazylunatic:

novakian:

questions of sex and gender explored on tumblr dot com

This entire post is golden

Idk why I’m laughing so hard

Apr 02
Apr 02
landstriderdovahkiin:

THIS IS OFFICIAL OK
bonus:

landstriderdovahkiin:

THIS IS OFFICIAL OK

bonus:

Apr 02
alrightkeithy:

manhood:

This could be us

Why you playing?

alrightkeithy:

manhood:

This could be us

Why you playing?

Apr 02
excessunrated:

a-giant-spider:

i’m convinced this is some kind of fetish

It could be.

excessunrated:

a-giant-spider:

i’m convinced this is some kind of fetish

It could be.

Mar 30

devildoll:

X-Men (1992-1997)

i hear the theme song in my head when i see this

Mar 30

overomega:

darkoverord:

ampvee:

gameplate:

Minecraft comic series by 

Alexander Diochon

This is a really cool take on how Minecraft would work ‘realistically’. Love it!

Hooooooooooooooooooooly fuck that’s awesome.

Literally the best interpretation of Minecraft I have ever seen I really want more.

Mar 30
thranduil-the-elven-king:

tardistiles:

byunbaekme:

baekenstrip:

yeolthatjoint:

Now we know

my life has been a lie

a lie

wait what

thranduil-the-elven-king:

tardistiles:

byunbaekme:

baekenstrip:

yeolthatjoint:

Now we know

my life has been a lie

a lie

wait what

Mar 30

postllimit:

pi day fun facts: i memorized 434 digits of pi in the sixth grade to beat a kid who claimed he knew 500 just bc he was an asshole

he knew six

Mar 30

kylekallgren:

Fuck you and your shoulder waist ratio indeed.